Positive Psychology Books

Positively Happy: Routes to Sustainable Happiness

By Sonja Lyubomirsky and Jaime Kurtz
In this book, experts Jaime Kurtz and best-selling author Sonja Lyubomirsky provide a crash course in increasing personal happiness. They offer a variety of happiness self-tests, specific tools for boosting happiness, and a research based argument that pursuing happiness is beneficial. These workbooks introduce readers to a variety of solid science and useful tools for improving life, relationships, and overall mental health.

The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology

By Shane Lopez and Charles Snyder
The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology provides a roadmap for the psychology needed by the majority of the population - those who don't need treatment but want to achieve the lives to which they aspire. Topics include not only happiness but also hope, strengths, positive emotions, life longings, creativity, emotional creativity, courage, and more, plus guidelines for applying what has worked for people across time and cultures.

Positive Psychology in Practice

Edited by P. Alex Linley and Stephen Joseph
Forward by Martin Seligman

A thorough and up-to-date guide to putting positive psychology into practice From the Foreword: "This volume is the cutting edge of positive psychology and the emblem of its future." -Martin E. P. Seligman.

The Pursuit of Perfect: How to Stop Chasing Perfection and Start Living a Richer, Happier Life

By Tal Ben-Shahar
Applying cutting-edge research in the field of positive psychology, Ben-Shahar takes us off the impossible pursuit of perfection and directs us to the way to happiness, richness, and true fulfillment. He shows us the freedom derived from not trying to do it all right all the time and the real lessons that failure and painful emotions can teach us.

Learned Optimism

by Martin E. P. Seligman
In this national bestseller, Martin E.P. Seligman shows you how to chart a new approach to living with "flexible optimism."

Stumbling on Happiness

by Dan Gilbert
In this brilliant, witty, and accessible book, renowned Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert describes the foibles of imagination and illusions of foresight that cause each of us to misconceive our tomorrows and misestimate our satisfactions. Vividly bringing to life the latest scientific research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy, and behavioral economics, Gilbert reveals what scientists have discovered about the uniquely human ability to imagine the future, and about our capacity to predict how much we will like it when we get there. With penetrating insight and sparkling prose, Gilbert explains why we seem to know so little about the hearts and minds of the people we are about to become.

The Myths of Happiness: What Should Make You Happy, but Doesn't, What Shouldn't Make You Happy, but Does

by Sonja Lyubomirsky
In The Myths of Happiness, Sonja Lyubomirsky isolates the major turning points of adult life, looking to both successes (marriage, children, wealth) and challenges (divorce, financial ruin, illness) to reveal that our misconceptions about the impact of such events is perhaps the greatest threat to our long-term well-being.

The Happiness Hypothesis

by Jonathan Haidt
Jonathan Haidt skillfully combines two genres-philosophical wisdom and scientific research-delighting the reader with surprising insights. He explains, for example, why we have such difficulty controlling ourselves and sticking to our plans; why no achievement brings lasting happiness, yet a few changes in your life can have profound effects, and why even confirmed atheists experience spiritual elevation. In a stunning final chapter, Haidt addresses the grand question "How can I live a meaningful life?," offering an original answer that draws on the rich inspiration of both philosophy and science.

A Primer in Positive Psychology

by Christopher Peterson
Positive psychology is the scientific study of what goes right in life, from birth to death and at all stops in between. It is a newly-christened approach within psychology that takes seriously the examination of that which makes life most worth living. Everyone's life has peaks and valleys, and positive psychology does not deny the valleys.